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Air Gun Case Study

An Alternative to Dry Machining

Occasionally a milling operation comes along that cannot be done using coolants to dissipate the heat. Such is an operation at a machine shop in New Miami, Ohio. They have a job using 4140 steel with a 35 Rc rating. The inserts are so hard that coolants are not recommended because they can cause cracking. The operation is set up at a speed of 1350 rpm with a 5 inch per minute feed rate. The 2 inch cutter has three inserts.

The customer requires the end product to be mirror finished. Any discoloration from the heat results in a scrap product. For this reason, the inserts must be replaced after every eight pieces. At $8.00 per insert plus the operators’ time to replace the spent units, another method of machining had to be found.

Qualiturn contacted AiRTX International, The Air Research Technology Company. They recommended the Stainless Steel Model 60040 that converts normal shop air into a 
subzero air stream and provides instant spot cooling. AiRTX manufactures the only Stainless Steel cooler on the market which is very practical over aluminum units in hot areas with high speed chips involved.

Using the Model 60040, Qualiturn was able to increase 
production by 400% before changing the insertsAccording to Mike Barber, owner of Qualiturn Machining Center, “the AiRTX Model 60040 at $275.00 was paid for during the first hour’s run of products”.

Compact, reliable, and maintenance free, the Stainless Steel Model 60040 provides a simple, clean, and coolant free solution to many machining operations. Just plug into a standard compressed air line (8090 psi), aim the flexible 12" nozzle, and let it go to work. The magnetic base holds the Model 60040 in place on the machine. 
The same subzero air is available regardless of the position of the Model 60040.

In addition to dry machining, the Stainless Steel Model 60040 can improve drilling, grinding, or tapping operations. Also cooling motors, parts, processors, and molds are easily achieved to increase production. You can even use the cold air to shrink shafts and the hot air for expanding a bearing’s trace for easy fits in pressing bearings onto shafts..

A specialty furniture design company, 1st in Design, has found a way to speed operations by removing wood burning discolorations before they occur. Using the Gold Air Gun model 60015, normal shop compresed air is cooled to 15 degrees F to cool the saw blades and router used in manufacturing wood furniture.

Burt Aarsen, owner of 1st in Design, says, "the Cold Air Gun is such a simple, clean, way to eliminate a time consuming step in making furniture. I use it in almost every drilling, sawing or router operation.

The Cold Air Gun also increases tool life by lessening the small heat cracks in the sharp edges of the tools and that means a sharper edge for a larger period of time".

We recently purchased the AiRTX Stainless Steel Air Gun model #60051 and have found it to be a great product. We tested this product on one of our lathes as well as our horizontal end mill with double angle cutters. With this product we increased tool life on the lathe by 300% (mild steel). Tool life on the end mill was increased by 250% (stainless steel) and 350% (mild steel). "I figure that this product paid for itself within 3 weeks of purchase. I highly recommend this product".

Courtesy of AGS Group, Inc.


A TechnoIsel Series III CNC router cuts knife 
templates from a strip of plastic. Unique also uses the router to manufacture carved mouldings and baseboards. The router is mounted with an Airtx Model 60040 Air Gun for spot cooling, making the plastic easier to work with and prolonging the life of the router bits.

Courtesy of 
Custom Woodworking 
Business Magazine


Unique Woodworking Carving uses a TechnoIsel Series III PCdriven CNC router to cut the knife 
template into a strip of plastic. Owner Jay Bouxsein says that 
initially, working with the plastic was difficult because it melted — chips that were cut off would 
readhere to the piece, so the 
template would require significant cleaning before it could be used.

Bouxsein found a solution by mounting an Airtx Model 60040 Air Gun to the router. The gun is a Stainless Steel Vortex Tube. When compressed air is spun in the tube, the air on one side cools while the other side heats up. “I thought, ‘It’s heat we’re trying 
to avoid. I’ll just get one of these tubes and blow cold air on the thing,’” he says. “It works like a champ. It cools [the plastic] just enough so that I don’t get the meltback.”

The cool air also helps protect the carbide router bits, which can soften under heat and wear out more quickly, he adds.